Neuroscience and Psychology

The neurons that rewrite traumatic memories

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Memories of traumatic experiences can lead to mental health issues such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which can destroy a person’s life. It is currently estimated that almost a third of all people will suffer from fear- or stress-related disorders at one point in their lives.

Source: Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

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Link found between neurotransmitter imbalance, brain connectivity in those with autism

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One in 59 children in the United States lives with a form of autism spectrum disorder, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The signs of autism begin in early childhood and can affect individuals differently. However, many with autism share similar symptoms, including difficulties with social communication. Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and MU Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders identified a link between a neurotransmitter imbalances and brain connectivity between regions of the brain that play a role in social communication and language. The study found two tests that could lead to more precise medical treatments.

Source: University of Missouri-Columbia

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No more sweet tooth? Scientists switch off pleasure from food in brains of mice

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New research in mice has revealed that the brain’s underlying desire for sweet, and its distaste for bitter, can be erased by manipulating neurons in the amygdala, the emotion center of the brain. The research points to new strategies for understanding and treating eating disorders including obesity and anorexia nervosa.

Source: The Zuckerman Institute at Columbia University

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Diabetics’ risk for depression : an insight into brain activity

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 Feeling of sadness, anger and anxiety are part of daily life with people who are obese or living with diabetes or prediabetes. A recent study suggests that such negative feelings may rise due to problems with blood sugar levels that influence emotional response in the brain. It is found that people with Type 2 diabetes and prediabetes were more likely to focus on and have a strong emotional response to threats and negative things, which affects quality of life and increases risk for depression.

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Mice regrow brain tissue after stroke with bioengineered gel

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In a first-of-its-kind finding, a new stroke-healing gel helped regrow neurons and blood vessels in mice with stroke-damaged brains

Source: University of California – Los Angeles

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Spontaneous Regression of the Sequestrated Cervical Discs: A Prospective Study of 70 Cases

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The validity of conservative management in certain type of acute cervical disc herniation based on amelioration of brachialgia has been described previously. But, disappearance of radiculopathy secondary to spontaneous resolution of the disc material being demonstrated in control MRI has been sporadically reported as a case report or small series.

 Source: https://www.scitechnol.com/peer-review/spontaneous-regression-of-the-sequestrated-cervical-discs-a-prospective-study-of-70-cases-a7ms.php?article_id=7264

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Keywords: Cervical disc; Conservative management; Extruded disc; Periradiular block

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Scientists uncover brain circuits behind putting up a fight or freezing in place

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In a study of mice, National Institutes of Health-funded researchers describe a new circuit involved in fine-tuning the brain’s decision either to hide or confront threats

Investigated the role of the ventral midline thalamus (vMT) in determining how animals respond to visual threats. The thalamus is a brain region that acts as a relay station, taking in sensory information, such as what is seen and heard, and sorting out where in the brain to send that information.

Source: NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

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