Neuroscience and Psychology

Surrogate decision makers experience psychological distress, study finds

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Nearly half of the 13 million older adults hospitalized annually in the United States are unable to make their own medical decisions and rely on surrogates, usually close family members, to make decisions for them. However little is known about how these surrogates respond to the demands put upon them. A new study explores predictors and frequency of surrogate decision-maker distress and has found high levels of both anxiety and depression.

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Traumatic stress interacts with bipolar disorder genetic risk to increase odds of suicide attempt

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Genetic susceptibility to bipolar disorder can increase the risk for suicide attempt, but only among those who also have experienced traumatic stress, reports a new study. Suicide in 2015 was the second leading cause of death among teens ages 15-19 with steep increases in suicide risk from ages 14 to 20. Bipolar disorder (BD) is one of the most heritable psychiatric conditions and is associated with high suicide risk.

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Psychiatric cases

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The Psychiatrists face few challenging cases in their career. Those real life cases are a medium for the psychiatry trainees to learn & grow. The identity of the patients is always altered or remains hidden. The cases are featured because most of them involve a diagnostic or therapeutic dilemma.

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Blunt Head Trauma and Effects

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Blunt head trauma can happen from a blow to the head, and result in serious damage to the brain. According to the National Institutes of Health, the impact can range from a minor bump to severe brain injury. According to braininjury.com, the majority of traumatic brain injuries (61 percent) occurs due to traffic accidents. Even if the head trauma does not result in an open wound, injury can occur to the brain. The effects of blunt head trauma are irreversible and severe, and can interfere with normal brain function.
Types: Two types of head trauma can occur: concussion and contusion. With a concussion, the brain is shaken, while a contusion causes direct injury to the brain. According to braininjury.com, the loss of consciousness from a blunt head trauma leads to even more damage to the brain. In addition, injury can occur to the opposite side of the brain—called contrecoupe—when the head is moving and hits a stationary object. This blunt force results in the opposite side of the brain pulling away from the skull and becoming injured.

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Healthy mitochondria could stop Alzheimer’s

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Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia and neurodegeneration worldwide. A major hallmark of the disease is the accumulation of toxic plaques in the brain, formed by the abnormal aggregation of a protein called beta-amyloid inside neurons. Still without cure, Alzheimer’s poses a significant burden on public health systems. Most treatments focus on reducing the formation of amyloid plaques, but these approaches have been inconclusive. As a result, scientists are now searching for alternative treatment strategies, one of which is to consider Alzheimer’s as a metabolic disease

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Smartphone addiction creates imbalance in brain, study suggests

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Researchers have found an imbalance in the brain chemistry of young people addicted to smartphones and the internet. According to a recent research, 46 percent of Americans say they could not live without their smartphones. While this sentiment is clearly hyperbole, more and more people are becoming increasingly dependent on smartphones and other portable electronic devices for news, information, games, and even the occasional phone call. Along with a growing concern that young people, in particular, may be spending too much time staring into their phones instead of interacting with others, come questions as to the immediate effects on the brain and the possible long-term consequences of such habits.

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How to Start Healing After Sexual Trauma

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With sexual harassment and abuse being covered so frequently in the media over these last few weeks, it seemed like a good time to talk about how to move forward and start to heal after abuse. Of course, this is a huge topic, so we’re getting started with how to manage the effects of sexual trauma on your own. Next week, we’ll talk about navigating the waters with new partners. The healing process looks different for every person, but here are some steps that you may find helpful.
1. Acknowledge the Trauma
2. Don’t Blame Yourself
3. Be Aware of Potential Impacts
4. Identify Your Triggers
5. Come Up With Goals
6. Take Really Good Care of Yourself
7. Get Support

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