Medical

Artificial bile ducts grown in lab and transplanted into mice could help treat liver disease

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Scientists have developed a new method for growing and transplanting artificial bile ducts that could in future be used to help treat liver disease in children, reducing the need for liver transplantation. The study suggests that it will be feasible to generate and transplant artificial human bile ducts using a combination of cell transplantation and tissue engineering technology. This approach provides hope for the future treatment of diseases of the bile duct; at present, the only option is a liver transplant.

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Male hepatitis B patients suffer worse liver ailments, regardless of lifestyle

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A new study determined that it doesn’t matter where a person lives or the choices they make, male hepatitis B patients will always be at greater risk for more severe liver illnesses. In an attempt to explain the disparity between the two, suggestions have been made that lifestyle choices, such as drinking, smoking or even how much water a person drinks, might be the reason.

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Black tea may help with weight loss, too

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Researchers have demonstrated for the first time that black tea may promote weight loss and other health benefits by changing bacteria in the gut. In a study of mice, the scientists showed that black tea alters energy metabolism in the liver by changing gut metabolites. The study found that both black and green tea changed the ratio of intestinal bacteria in the animals: The percentage of bacteria associated with obesity decreased, while bacteria associated with lean body mass increased.

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Possible therapeutic target for regulating body weight

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A new study published online in The FASEB Journal reveals a novel gene involved in maintaining body weight. Specifically, the study suggests that GTRAP3-18 interacts with pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) in the hypothalamus to regulate food intake and blood glucose levels. Inhibiting the interaction between GTRAP3-18 and POMC might be a strategy for treating leptin/insulin resistance in patients with obesity and/or type 2 Diabetes. Researchers have analyzed a group of mice defective in the GTRAP3-18 gene. The GTRAP3-18-deficient mice were lean as compared with wild type mice. The leanness was due to neither increased locomotive activity nor basal metabolism, but rather a dysregulation of feeding behavior, or hypophagia. The GTRAP3-18-deficient mice also displayed hypoglycemia.

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Aging

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Aging is accumulation of changes during a person over time, encompassing physical, psychological, and social modification. Aging harm happens to deoxyribonucleic acid, proteins, and lipids, to cells and to organs. Diseases of maturity like inflammatory disease, pathology, cardiopathy, cancer, prehensile dementia are usually distinguished from aging. It’s characterised by the declining ability to retort to worry, enhanced physiological condition imbalance, and enhanced risk of aging-associated diseases

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Importance of Biochemistry in Medical Technology

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Biochemistry also known as biological chemistry biochemistry is the study of chemical processes within the cells related to living organisms. By knowing the information flow through biochemical signalling between the cells and the flow of chemical energy through metabolism, metabolic processes which give rise to the complexity of life and the Biochemistry is mainly related to the molecular biology and mechanisms of the cells

Imaging of Recurrent Head and Neck Tumors in Patients with Prior Flap Reconstruction

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The imaging diagnosis of recurrent disease is challenging in the post-treatment neck, particularly with flap reconstruction of complex head and neck post-surgical cancer defects. These may be further complicated by post-operative radiation. Distortion of anatomy and loss of normal neck symmetry after surgical resection and from radiation fibrosis also limits clinical assessment, and despite the promise of imaging, many modalities are limited by false-positive results, particularly in the early post-surgical period . Contrastenhanced cross-sectional imaging, particularly CT, remains the mainstay for evaluating patients early in the post-treatment period and for routine surveillance and patterns of disease recurrence can be readily apparent to the experienced eye . To know more visit the Link

https://www.scitechnol.com/peer-review/imaging-of-recurrent-head-and-neck-tumors-in-patients-with-prior-flap-reconstruction-viya.php?article_id=6273