Medical

It’s Time For Personalized Medicine In Cardiac Transplantation; One Size Does Not Fit All

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Does the approach of “one size fits all” apply to induction and immunosuppression in cardiac transplantation make sense? For example, does a 68 year old Caucasian male with 0% panel reactive antibodies with a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) and a driveline infection get the same induction and maintenance therapy as a 25 year old African-American female with multiple pregnancies and 85% panel reactive antibodies? Many centers the answer would be yes and we need to change this archaic way of practicing transplant medicine. There is a delicate balance between rejection and infection and with each patient that balance must be maximized. When looking at the 2015 International Society of Heart and Lung Transplant registry, approximately 50% Read more

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Sweat May Pass on Hepatitis B in Contact Sports

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Sweat may be another way to pass on hepatitis B infection during contact sports, suggests research published ahead of print in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. Hepatitis B virus attacks the liver and can cause lifelong infection, cirrhosis (scarring) of the liver, liver cancer, liver failure and death.

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Toward A Banana-based Vaccine For Hepatitis B

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Bananas have emerged as the best candidate to deliver a bite-sized vaccine for hepatitis B virus (HBV) to millions of people in developing countries, according to a recent article. Research efforts to genetically engineer plants as biofactories for the production of vaccines. They focus on transferring genes to produce HBV vaccine, noting that there already are 350 million carriers of hepatitis B worldwide, with 1 million new cases annually. An estimated 75 million -100 million of those infected individuals may die from liver cirrhosis or liver cancer.

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Adult stem cells from liposuction used to create blood vessels in the lab

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Researchers used stem cells from fat to grow new small-diameter blood vessels in the laboratory. Lab-grown small-diameter blood vessels could help patients undergoing procedures such as heart bypass surgery. Adult stem cells derived from fat are turned into smooth muscle cells in the laboratory, and then “seeded” onto a very thin collagen membrane. As the stem cells multiplied, the researchers rolled them into tubes matching the diameter of small blood vessels. In three to four weeks, they grew into usable blood vessels.

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Laser liposuction melts fat, results in tighter skin

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A new, minimally invasive treatment that uses lasers to melt fat could replace the “tummy tuck,” suggests research on more than 2,000 people. Without the risks of a surgical procedure (such as the tummy tuck) and when used in combination with standard liposuction, the fat-melting action of laser lipolysis, a minimally invasive treatment, has the added benefit of producing new collagen (collagen is the main protein that gives the skin its tone and texture). Additionally, the laser causes the collagen to contract, which tightens the skin. This tightening alleviates the fear of skin sagging, a common complaint after standard liposuction. Laser lipolysis also enables the removal of more fat than standard liposuction.

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Process Of Building Patient-Nurse Relationships In Child And Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatient Care: A Grounded Theory Approach In Japan

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The objective of the present study is to describe the process of building closer patient-nurse relationships in child and adolescent psychiatric inpatient care. Nurses play important roles in psychiatric inpatient care for children and adolescents, and their care can affect every facet of their daily life. The efficacy of treatment depends on the nurses’ ability to build intimate patientnurse relationships.

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Statistical Methods in Evaluation of Multidimensional Symptoms in Nursing Research

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Since completing advanced degrees in statistics and epidemiology, I have participated in nursing research at Yale School of Nursing (YSN) by providing statistical support for grants. While analyzing data from diverse subjects with cancer, diabetes, sleep disorders, cardiac disease, autism, and other health conditions, I have encountered common statistical problems with inter-correlated multidimensional outcomes in longitudinal observations. One of my primary research interests is to find analytic methods to overcome statistical problems in symptom evaluation.

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