https://www.scitechnol.com/clinical-dermatology-research-journal.php

Radiation dermatitis

Posted on

Irritant contact dermatitis accounts for 80% of all contact dermatitis reactions. It occurs when the skin comes in contact with a substance that acts as an irritant. Even though over 2800 substances have been identified as irritants, almost any substance under the right circumstances can act as an irritant.

Skin Barrier in Irritant Contact Dermatitis
The epidermis acts as a barrier with an outer layer composed of dead cells in a water-protein-lipid matrix.

Acute Irritant Contact Dermatitis
Acute irritant contact dermatitis occurs when the skin comes in contact with a strong toxic chemical such as an acid or alkali. The rash occurs within minutes to hours after exposure and in most cases, healing occurs soon after exposure. This rash usually has sharp borders and consists of redness, vesicles, bullae, or skin sloughing.

  • Picture of irritant contact dermatitis on the foot

Chronic Cumulative Irritant Contact Dermatitis
Chronic cumulative irritant contact dermatitis is the more common of the two. This dermatitis occurs after repeated exposure to low-level irritants, such as soaps or shampoos. The rash may take weeks, months, or even years to develop.

The rash usually has poorly-defined borders, is very itchy, and consists of redness, scaling, fissuring, and lichenification.

  • Picture of irritant contact dermatitis on the hand

Treatment of Irritant Contact Dermatitis
The mainstay of treatment for irritant contact dermatitis is avoiding as many of the irritants as possible.

Other helpful measures include:

  • Reduce water exposure – because frequent water exposure actually dries out the skin and disrupts the barrier function of the epidermis, keep water contact to a minimum.
  • Moisturize – Frequent moisturization improves the barrier function of the skin. Avoid the use of moisturizers with perfumes since these may also act as an irritant.
  • Protection – Because the hands are often affected by irritant contact dermatitis, the use of gloves may help reduce exposure to the irritant.
  • Topical steroids – Medium- to high-strength topical steroids may be needed to reduce inflammation and itching.

To Know more: https://www.scitechnol.com/clinical-dermatology-research-journal.php

Any queries: dermatology@scitechnol.com

The Significance of Beards

Posted on

Facial hair is in right now, whether it’s a subtle five o’clock shadow, a goatee, a full Duck Dynasty beard or some other variation. But beards haven’t always been this popular, and they’ve represented more than just fashion trends and primitive ways to protect your skin.

Going back to the Dynastic period in Egypt, facial hair was seen as a low class sign of animal tendencies. Men even went as far as removing their eyelashes!

As time went on, beards grew in favor. In ancient Greece, for example, beards were seen as signs of virility, manhood and wisdom. They were cut only during a time of mourning or as a form of punishment to Spartans.

The ancient Romans decided to distinguish themselves from the Greeks by being clean-shaven. It was so important to Roman culture that religious ceremonies were held when boys shaved for the first time.

By the years 330 – 1750 in Europe, facial hair had mixed support. While knights maintained beards as a sign of masculinity and honor, King Henry VIII and Queen Elizabeth weren’t fans, at least on those they ruled. King Henry kept his beard while everyone else had to pay a tax for growing one.

Forward ahead to the early 1900s in America and facial hair was not in vogue. Soldiers in WWI couldn’t have beards because they could interfere with gas masks. This led to a no-beard trend that continued until after WWII. Beards eventually made a comeback years later when they were sported by hippies and the Beatles.

Religions have different views on the topic. Christians didn’t depict Jesus with a beard until 500 CE, and early popes and bishops opposed beards. In Islam, beards are seen as an indicator of religious devotion to the Qur’an. Meanwhile, most Jewish men learn that Leviticus 19:27 maintains they can only trim and remove facial hair with scissors or, in modern times, an electric razor.

Politicians typically avoid beards because historically it was a sign of protest and later it suggested opposition to women’s issues. While many sports clubs used to have a less-than-favorable view of beards, that has changed in recent years. In 2015, more professional baseball players had beards than not.

Today, facial hair is popular enough that there is a World Beard and Mustache Championship and hipster men in New York have been known to pay more than $8,000 for facial hair transplants to fix less-than-perfect beards.

To know more: http://bit.ly/1QM6nmv
Submit your manuscript: dermatology@scitechnol.com (or) dermatology@scitechnol.org

Men With Hair Loss

Posted on

It’s a significant riddle technology has yet to completely solve, but there’s definite progress. Male pattern baldness is that mysterious condition that has enormous social significance but almost no medical significance and it’s been a great boon to the baseball cap industry, of course.

In this survey, we take the pulse of American men who have experienced hair loss, to understand three primary things: how men respond to that hair loss (with treatments or lack thereof), what motivates their responses, and how they feel about the subject overall.

The first order of business for us was to establish how much hair men are losing. Between thinning hair and more significant hair loss that results in bald spots, widow’s peaks and full baldness, it’s a fifty-fifty split. Among the half of men experiencing more severe hair loss, 43 percent report having a bald spot or widow’s peak and seven percent report they are fully bald. Naturally, the response to hair loss is informed by the amount of hair that’s been lost, so it’s important to keep these baselines in mind.

Surprising or not, a majority of men do very little to address their hair loss (particularly in the Northeast)—50 percent have responded by cutting their hair short or shaving it all off, while an additional one in four men don’t do anything different as their hair begins to disappear.

The least likely response is to go under the knife—just one percent of men undergo hair transplant surgery. Much more popular are shampoo treatments and medications like Rogaine and Propecia, the former being a spray, the latter being oral medication.
Guys on the West Coast are by far the most likely to explore over-the-counter treatments—nearly twice as many men experiencing hair loss on the West Coast have tried shampoos, than men in the Northeast. West Coast men are also most likely to have used sprays or medications: 34 percent on the West Coast have tried, versus an average of 18 percent throughout the rest of the country.

What motivates a particular guy’s response to his hair loss? Well, it’s not all about sex appeal. The most common answer was that doing something about it makes men feel more confident (sex appeal aside). That said, one in four men copped to wanting to enhance his sex appeal. Just behind that, statistically, was a desire to “fit in.” And the reasons men were least likely to cite as motivators to do something about their hair loss? It’s important to their work… or their significant other.

To know more: http://bit.ly/1QM6nmv
Submit your manuscript: dermatology@scitechnol.com (or) dermatology@scitechnol.org

Think Before You Ink

Posted on

A recent survey from England shows that close to 1/3 of people end up regretting their tattoos and that men are twice as likely as women to suffer such regret.

The first thing to realise about tattoos is that the ink is placed in the dermis, which is the deeper layer of the skin. The dermis is where all the connective tissue lies that make up the structure of your skin. It is also the layer of skin that leaves a scar if damaged. Superficial damage to your skin can typically heal with little or no residual mark. However, when the deeper layers of the skin are damaged, the tissue cannot repair itself without leaving a scar. This is an important point to consider before getting a tattoo.

Because the ink is deep in the skin, there is no cream or ointment that can get rid of a tattoo without leaving a scar. Although there is no shortage of websites claiming to remove your unwanted tattoo by applying their special cream or ointment, I know of none that is effective. It is not possible to bleach the pigment down deep without damaging the skin at the surface. Chemical treatments or acids that claim to get rid of tattoos could only do so by leaving a significant scar, like a third-degree burn.

Lasers tattoo removal works best. It can eliminate a tattoo by targeting the pigment. Since different lasers target different ink colours, they can more effectively blast the tiny ink fragments. The blast and destruction of the ink trigger your immune system to come in and clean up the spots, carrying the ink with it. Because the laser targets only the colour, it is able to treat the tattoo that is deep in your skin while leaving the surface of your skin undamaged. Professional tattoos tend to use a higher quality ink in higher quantities, which makes complete tattoo removal difficult. Therefore, realise that oftentimes a shadow of the tattoo remains even after extensive or repeated laser treatments.

Newer tattoo inks have been developed that are engineered specifically to be good targets for the laser. The laser is more easily able destroy these pigments, and the tattoo can be removed entirely, without any residual colour. You might want to ask your tattoo artist about this ink before you get your tattoo.

If you decide to remove your tattoo, then make an appointment with a board-certified dermatologist who has experience with laser tattoo removal. Realise that different colour inks require different lasers; black and red inks are easier to remove. Most patients need several treatments over a period of months to fully remove a tattoo, depending on the colour and size of the tattoo and your skin colour.

Keep in mind that laser tattoo removal is timely and expensive. Treatment sessions can be several hundred dollars each, and most people need several sessions over the course of many months. Even so, some tattoos are never completely removed.

So, please, think before you ink. It could save you a lot of time and money if the day comes when you no longer want it.

To know more: http://bit.ly/1QM6nmv
Any Queries: dermatology@scitechnol.com (or) dermatology@scitechnol.org

A Rarely Seen Entity: Morbus Morbihan Disease

Posted on

Morbus Morbihan disease is granulomatous complication characterized with facial edema occuring due to acne or rosacea. It is resistant to treatment; diagnosis could be difficult. 48 years old male patient applied to our polyclinic with complaint of swelling on left side of his face, around his eye and cheeks, persistent for 6 months. He previously applied to dermatology, dental and Otorhinolaryngology departments in various hospitals but no diagnosis could be made. There was no trauma, exposure to sun, drug use history or symptoms like pain and itch. He was complaining about visual swelling. He had edema stretching from left side of his face to orbital area and mild erythema in his dermatological examination. Our pathology department reevaluated biopsy preparations taken by the center he previously went. Rosacea lymphedema was reported. Doxycycline, ornidazole, ketotifen and flutamide were administered by assuming that patient has Morbus Morbihan disease. In the next examination after one month, it has been observed that edema was diminished. In fourth month, edema decreased a lot. Thus treatment was stopped. The patient was applied again in the following 2 months due to increase at edema on his face. That time 0.5 mg/day isotretinoin treatment started and at third month edema regressed. We found this case appropriate to present to emphasize that it is rare and that it should be considered.

To know more: http://bit.ly/1QM6nmv
Submit your manuscript: dermatology@scitechnol.com (or) dermatology@scitechnol.org

Healthcare Demographics and Specialty Variation in Atopic Dermatitis

Posted on

Importance: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common chronic skin disease with significant comorbidities and a dramatic impact on quality of life. Despite this, there is little-published information about healthcare utilization patterns for adults and children with AD.
Objective: To examine healthcare utilization for patients with AD who are cared for in a regional academic medical center.
Design: Retrospective cohort analysis. Setting: A mixed urban, suburban and rural catchment in the Western NY region.
Participants: All patients seeking medical care for their AD from March of 2011 to September 2015.
Main Measure(s): Age, sex, race, ethnicity, (demographics) and medical specialty (healthcare utilization). Patients were stratified and analyzed by age group.
Results: Adult AD patients (n=767) accounted for 38.2% of the AD population seeking healthcare in our system with a mean age of 42.7 ± 18.7 years. Among adults, females were seen more commonly than males (65.3% vs. 34.7%). In contrast, both genders were equally represented in the pediatric population (18 years; 35.2%). Dermatologists cared for the majority of patients (35.2%), followed by pediatricians (25.7%) and family medicine physicians (10.1%). African-Americans were nearly 3 times more likely than Caucasians to visit primary care physicians for their initial AD management (p<0001).
Conclusions and relevance: This study demonstrates that adult AD patients account for over a third of all AD visits in a regional academic medical center. Dermatologists managed the greatest number of AD patients, and the pediatric population was notable for a greater proportion of African American patients relative to the adults. This disparity between the proportions of African Americans in pediatric vs adult patients may reflect reduced access to care for adults. Alternatively, African-Americans may simply have a greater prevalence of pediatric onset AD coupled with greater disease resolution prior to adulthood. African-Americans also appear to seek

To know more: http://bit.ly/1QM6nmv
Submit your manuscript: dermatology@scitechnol.com (or) dermatology@scitechnol.org

Ways to Treat Damaged Hair in Winter

Posted on

It’s been a rough winter for most of the country. When you’ve got arctic temperatures and gusting winds you’ve also got low humidity in the air. And low humidity not only dries out your skin but also dries out your #hair. If your hair is feeling dry and brittle and is seeking the summer warmth, then read on.

Here are four tips to help you repair your damaged winter hair:

1. Reduce shampooing. Shampooing every second or third day will allow natural oils to remain on your hair and scalp and prevent further drying.

2. Go deep. Once to twice a week, massage a deep conditioner into your hair and scalp and let it rest as you shower. Then rinse with warm water. For extremely dry hair, try using a leave-in deep conditioner or conditioning hair mask that you apply before bedtime and rinse the following morning. Be sure to wear a hair net and to place a towel on your pillow so you don’t stain your bed sheets.

3. Go natural. Using hair dyers and other heating devices take a toll on your hair. When possible, allow your hair to air-dry, but aim for at least once to twice a week.

4. Cool off. Some women who chemically treat their hair (think highlights) and use heating devices regularly (think flatirons), develop trichorrhexis nodosa, or hair breakage. Once hair is broken, you can’t fix it. You can minimize additional damage by reducing usage of heating devices. Try every second or third day instead of every day.

To know more: http://bit.ly/1QM6nmv
Submit your manuscript: dermatology@scitechnol.com (or) dermatology@scitechnol.org