neuroscience

Lights and Shadows of Distal Deep Vein Thrombosis

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Distal deep venous thrombosis (DDVTs) is one of the grey areas of venous thromboembolism. There is a great heterogeneity in the diagnostic and therapeutic strategies between all the diagnostic centres. Studies doesn’t clarify the problem so it is not clear yet if there is any advantage in diagnosing and consequentially treating all the IDDVT. The 2012 ACCP guidelines suggested clinical observation for 2 weeks over initial anticoagulation (grade 2C) in patients with acute IDDVT without severe symptoms or risk factors for extension.

Read more at https://bit.ly/2IJtM75

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Deep vein thrombosis.jpg

 

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How to Think about “Implicit Bias”

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Amidst a controversy, it’s important to remember that implicit bias is real—and it matters.

When is the last time a stereotype popped into your mind? If you are like most people, the authors included, it happens all the time. That doesn’t make you a racist, sexist, or whatever-ist. It just means your brain is working properly, noticing patterns, and making generalizations. But the same thought processes that make people smart can also make them biased. This tendency for stereotype-confirming thoughts to pass spontaneously through our minds is what psychologists call implicit bias. It sets people up to overgeneralize, sometimes leading to discrimination even when people feel they are being fair.

 Journal home page: https://www.scitechnol.com/spine-neurosurgery.php

It’s Not My Fault, My Brain Implant Made Me Do It

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Where does responsibility lie if a person acts under the influence of their brain implant?

The link between the two? Both Mr. B and Mr. X received deep brain stimulation (DBS), a procedure involving an implant that sends electric impulses to specific targets in the brain to alter neural activity. While brain implants aim to treat neural dysfunction, cases like these demonstrate that they may influence an individual’s perception of the world and behavior in undesired ways.

Journal home page: https://www.scitechnol.com/spine-neurosurgery.php

Caseworkers Get Resources to Better Help Children in Trauma

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Montana Child and Family Services caseworkers have a new resource to access expert advice in cases where children have experienced extreme trauma, Gov. Steve Bullock announced Thursday. The Department of Public Health and Human Services is partnering with Billings Clinic and a program within the University of Montana School of Social Work to hold monthly video conferences offering education and feedback from national experts on child trauma. The training sessions include at least one case discussion. Health department director Sheila Hogan said the pilot program will give caseworkers clinical insight and recommendations while allowing them to discuss the challenges they face and learn from each other to better help kids. “Ultimately, the goal is to utilize the group’s collective expertise to make meaningful recommendations for caseworkers who work on these very complex cases daily,” Hogan said. The collaboration is made possible by a video-based mentoring platform used by Billings Clinic to reach clinicians across the state on a variety of topics. UM’s Center for Children, Families and Workforce Development helps with an agenda, technical help and ongoing training and mentoring for caseworkers. The effort will help caseworkers recognize and better understand the mental health impacts of the trauma the children have experienced, said Jeff Folsom with the UM Center. Dr. Eric Arzubi, a child and adolescent psychiatrist with Billings Clinic, offered to provide Project ECHO’s video platform and access to national experts to the state agency, Hogan said. “I’m just really grateful that we’re able to have this level of expertise in the child protection services system,” Hogan said. The first 90-minute session was held in February, and more than 100 people joined the second session Thursday, she said. “It’s key that we understand clinically what might be happening with children who have experienced trauma,” Mariela Herrera, a child and adolescent psychiatrist at Billings Clinic, said in a statement. “By sharing information and ideas we’ll be able to provide valuable clinical insight that could help more children stay home and out of foster care, or help expedite getting those in foster care home more quickly. We may also be able to identify gaps in the child protection system.” The program’s effectiveness will be evaluated after six months, Hogan said. Project ECHO also offers video conferences for providers statewide on topics such as addictions treatment within the Department of Corrections, opioid addiction treatment and mental health treatment.

Submit related articles for Journal of Trauma and Rehabilitation by opening the below link https://www.scitechnol.com/submission/

Trauma children

Trauma and dementia patients given hope by ‘flashbulb memory’ breakthrough.

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University of Sussex scientists have made a telling breakthrough in detailing the formation of ‘flashbulb memories’, which can help a snail find a sugary treat but also mean a war survivor repeatedly relives their trauma. The new research brings us much closer to understanding how traumatic memories could be controlled and the cruel blockade on new memories lifted. Prof George Kemenes and Dr Sergei Korneev at the University of Sussex have identified a specific molecule, a microRNA (miRNA, a very short RNA that does not code any proteins), which plays a key role in ensuring a long-term memory is formed. The finding could be an important step towards developing treatments for dementia patients as it sheds new light into how two ‘yin and yang’ proteins, CREB1 and CREB2, control the formation or suppression of memories. The findings from this BBSRC-funded project are significant because it is the first time that specific miRNAs have been shown to play key roles in the forming of long-term memories after a single episode of learning and adds new understanding to how even simple organisms like snails can remember a task after just one attempt. The discovery, by neuroscientists working in the School of Life Sciences at the University of Sussex and assisted by colleagues at the University of Oxford and in the Koltzov Institute of Developmental Biology of the Russian Academy of Sciences, was established through testing how great pond snails (Lymnaea stagnalis) are able to retain the memory of carrying out a simple task through single trial learning. In tests, levels of the miRNA Lym-miR-137 were found to significantly increase shortly after single trial learning. This then led to a reduction in the protein Lym-CREB2 mRNA, which is known to play a role in the restriction of memories by acting as a molecular constraint of memory formation. The results were initially a surprise to the research team as previous experiments on mice showed that reductions in miRNA had enhanced some types of learning and memory. The team believe that different types of learning are linked with distinct types of miRNA and that a whole complex ‘soup’ of miRNA might be involved in the formation of different types of memory. The levels of 14 different miRNAs were all found to be altered at differing times during the single-trial learning process. Prof Kemenes believes that by learning how to control the levels of CREB2 and its counterpart CREB1, a drug could be developed that would relieve the block on forming new memories in dementia patients. Similarly it has the potential to be used to help repress painful memories within those suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. Prof Kemenes said: “Controlling the levels of CREB1 and CREB2 helps animals to retain only the memories that are useful for completing a simple task rather than trying to retain a lot of superfluous information. “The way snails form memories for this kind of learning is similar to how they are formed within humans. “The flashbulb formation of a memory that is then retained for a lifetime often involves the creation of a very negative memory such as something particularly traumatic or violent but it can also happen after something much more pleasant like a first kiss. “The more we can learn about the physical process of forming memories, the more hope there is that we could eventually learn ways to counteract conditions where memories are too traumatic or where new memories are being restricted.”

Submit related articles for Journal of Trauma and Rehabilitation by opening the below link https://www.scitechnol.com/submission/

Violent Behaviors That Occur During Sleep Disorders Are Provoked, Study Suggests

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Summary: Disorders of arousal (i.e., sleepwalking, confusional arousals and sleep terrors) have sometimes been associated with violent behaviors against other individuals. A preliminary review of possible triggers for violence during disorders of arousal finds that violent behavior most frequently

Source: American Academy of Sleep Medicine

Adult sleepwalking is serious condition that impacts health-related quality of life

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Summary: A new study found that adult sleepwalking is a potentially serious condition that may induce violent behaviors and affect health-related quality of life.

Source: American Academy of Sleep Medicine