Genetics & Molecular Biology

Genes can affect lean body mass

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Current research shows that lean mass is highly heritable. By understanding the genetic contributions to lean mass – an indicator of muscle mass- future treatments may be developed to prevent the loss of lean mass with aging.

With age, some people develop a condition called “sarcopenia” where they lose critical amounts of muscle mass, to the point that they develop functional impairments and disabilities. Scientists are now stressing to pinpoint the genes associated with lean mass that may one day lead to therapies that will curtail loss of lean mass and prevent the onset of such disabilities.

Chronic fatigue syndrome can be diagnosed by Inflammatory biomarkers

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Researchers have discovered inflammation biomarkers that could help scientists to research, diagnose and even treat chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS).

As of myalgic encephomyelitis, CFS is also a poorly-understood condition characterized by profound, long-term tiredness. Researchers have previously reported observing some signs of inflammation in CFS patients, but later they found the biomarkers which can be applied for the diagnosis of CFS. However, the development of high-throughput methods has meant screening of the immune system for inflammation biomarkers is now possible on a scale that has not previously been achievable.

Medication on Necrotizing Fasciitis

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Necrotizing Fasciitis is a rare disease that is often called as the Flesh Eating Disease, which leads to the damage of the body’s soft tissue which is said to be as fascia.

For more related information on the article, visit us on at http://www.scitechnol.com/pharmaceutics-drug-delivery-research.php

Formation of Melanoma Tumors

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Researchers at the University of Iowa did just that, documenting in real time and in 3-D how melanoma cells form tumors. The cells waste no time finding their cancerous cousins, slashing their way through a lab-prepared gel to quickly join other melanoma cells and form tumors.

Biology professor David Soll and his team used unique computer-assisted 3-D reconstruction software to chronicle how both breast tissue cancer cells and melanoma cells form tumors. The group found the two cancers act similarly in the joining stages of tumor formation. With that knowledge, they screened more than four dozen monoclonal antibodies — unique agents that can stop cells from growing or forming tumors and can be mass produced — before finding two that block tumor creation in both types of cancer.

For more related information on the article, visit us on at https://www.scitechnol.com/clinical-dermatology-research-journal.php

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New nanotechnology application for difficult-to-treat cancers

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A new treatment combining shock waves with nanoparticles can successfully treat tumors that are difficult to target using conventional chemotherapy. This is the first time this combined therapy has been tested in live animals. The findings of this pre-clinical study could lead to the development of more effective therapies for treating life-threatening cancers in the future.

Read More at https://www.scitechnol.com/nanomaterials-molecular-nanotechnology.php

Cellular systems and biology breakthroughs

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There are various factors that can impact the health of a biological system, such as the cell cycle, differentiation of cells, carcinogenesis and biophysical factors. Changes in these areas can lead to altered transcription and translation of proteins, hence leading to differences in the proteome. It is evident that further advancement in the field of quantitative proteomics could lead to increased analysis and understanding of cellular systems and biology. This has the potential to be applied in a healthcare setting to improve patient health outcomes.To know more.. http://www.scitechnol.com/abstract.php?abstract_id=4139

Significant goal for current proteomics researchers: Proteome of human plasma

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Another significant goal for current proteomics researchers is to characterize the proteome of human plasma. However, this is thought to the most challenging proteome within the human body as it includes various proteins, such as immunoglobulin, cytokines, hormones and haemostatic proteins. The proteome of human plasma holds insight about the physiological wellbeing of all other tissues within the body and is easily accessible for testing from individuals. Therefore, if the proteome can be established the information would be invaluable for medical purposes and could potentially be used as a diagnostic tool for a wide range of health conditions..To know more… http://www.scitechnol.com/abstract.php?abstract_id=3544