Genetics & Molecular Biology

Computationally designed protein assemblies are advancing research in synthetic life and in targeted drug delivery

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Scientists have created computationally designed protein assemblies that display some functions normally associated with living things, in the search for ways to transport therapeutic cargo into specific types of cells without using viruses as vehicles. These encapsulate their own RNA genomes and evolve new traits in complex environments. They are synthetic versions of the protein shells that viruses use to protect and deliver materials. The synthetic proteins evolved better RNA packaging, resistance against degrading enzymes in blood and longer circulation time.

Source: University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine

To know more: https://www.scitechnol.com/journal-genes-and-proteins.php

Submit your manuscript: genesproteins@journalsoa.org

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In Silico Inhibition Studies of AXL Kinase by Curcumin and its Natural Derivatives

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The last few years have seen the intensive investigation efforts for understanding the wide relevance of AXL activation in multiple aspects of oncogenesis, invasion, metastasis and drug resistance. Therfore, targeting AXL can be considered as one of the promissing approaches for the treatement of cancer. A series of curcumin derivatives which are natural polyphenolic coumponds were wellreported as an anti cancer and chemopreventive agents. We have investigated them as an ATP-competitive inhibitors of AXL kinase by using a docking studies. Read more

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Toxin-Producing Bacteria

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Our skin is covered with bacteria as part of our normal skin microbiome and typically serves as a barrier that protects us from infection and inflammation. However, when that barrier is broken, the increased exposure to certain bacteria really causes problems,” says Lloyd Miller, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of dermatology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

The bacteria Staphylococcus aureus, or S. aureus, is an important human pathogen and the most common cause of skin infections in people. Miller says, “20 to 30 percent of the U.S. population have S. aureus living on their skin or in their nose, and over time, up to 85 percent of people come into contact with it. Eczema is an inflammatory skin disease that affects 20 percent of children and about 5 percent of adults. Ninety percent of patients with eczema have exceedingly high numbers of S. aureus bacteria on their inflamed skin.”

It was previously shown by others that a rare disease called generalized pustular psoriasis (in which the skin erupts into pustules) was caused by a genetic mutation that resulted in the unrestrained activity of a protein normally produced in our skin, called IL-36. This, says Miller, was a clue that IL-36 might have something to do with how bacteria on the skin surface induce inflammation. So they set out to test this idea in mice. They soaked a small gauze pad with S. aureus and applied it to the back skin of normal mice and those that had been genetically engineered to lack the receptor for IL-36 that triggers inflammatory responses. Miller’s team found the normal mice developed scaly and inflamed skin, and the genetically engineered mice lacking IL-36 activity had almost no skin inflammation.

Read More: http://bit.ly/2eSEXAz

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Genetic variation in V gene of class II Newcastle disease virus

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The genetic variation and molecular evolution of the V quality of the class II Newcastle malady infection (NDV) detaches with genotypes I– XVIII were resolved utilizing bioinformatics. Results demonstrated that low homology existed in various genotype infections, though high homology regularly for similar genotypes, special case might be existed inside genotypes I, V, VI, and XII. Grouping investigation demonstrated that the hereditary variety of V protein was reliable with infection genotype, and particular marks on the V protein for nine genotypes were recognized. Phylogenetic examination exhibited that the phylogenetic trees were exceptionally reliable between the V and F qualities, with slight inconsistencies in the sub-genotypes. Evolutionary rate analyses based on V and F genes revealed the evolution rates varied in genotypes.  This information shows that the hereditary variety of V protein is genotype-related and will help in illustrating the atomic advancement of NDV.

The dilemma of genetic variation: Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) and stroke

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Ischaemic stroke, which is for the most part caused by atherosclerosis, is a standout amongst the most generally reasons for mortality and bleakness. A standout amongst the most essential enzymatic activities of paraoxonase-1 (PON1) in relationship with high-thickness lipoprotein (HDL) is the aversion of low-thickness lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation, which gives it a hostile to atherogenic movement. PON1 articulation and movement is affected by different components; the most imperative of which is hereditary polymorphism, basically single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The aftereffects of different examinations in various populaces demonstrate that a few SNPs of the PON1 quality are related with stroke.

CRISPR-Cas9 technique targeting epigenetics reverses disease in mice

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Scientists report a modified CRISPR-Cas9 technique that alters the activity, rather than the underlying sequence, of disease-associated genes. The researchers demonstrate that this technique can be used in mice to treat several different diseases.

Source: Cell Press

To know more: https://www.scitechnol.com/journal-genes-and-proteins.php

Submit your manuscript: genesproteins@journalsoa.org

Updates on Saliva Collection Devices for Proteomics

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There has been a rapid growth in the interest and adaptation of saliva as a diagnostic specimen over the last decade, and in the last few years in particular, there have been major developments involving the application of saliva as a clinically relevant specimen. Saliva provides a “window” into the oral and systemic health of an individual, and like other bodily fluids, saliva can be analyzed and studied to diagnose diseases. With the advent of new, more sensitive technologies to detect smaller concentrations of analytes in saliva relative to blood levels, there have been a number of critical developments in the field that we will describe to know more please visit https://www.scitechnol.com/abstract/a-networkbased-analysis-of-proteins-involved-in-hypoxia-stress-and-identification-of-leader-proteins-4982.html