Environmental

Analysis of Tree Diversity Patterns in the Tropical Evergreen and Moist Deciduous Forests of the Middle Andaman Islands, India

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Tropical rainforests constitute one of the world’s richest biomes with high species diversity. They play a crucial role in controlling global climate besides providing several direct benefits known to all. Several studies have been carried out to estimate the biodiversity of these forests at various sites across the world and have helped in identifying potential sites of species richness and diversity as well as hotspots that harbour high endemism. However, Andaman and Nicobar Islands situated in between the Bay of Bengal in the west and the Andaman Sea in the east have not been explored much owing to their remoteness and inaccessibility, along with hostile cannibalistic natives and other tribal communities. In the current study, phytosociological data were collected in two predominant forest types of the Middle Andaman Islands to analyze their tree diversity patterns.

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Habitat Selection of Dendrocygna javanica in Heterogeneous Lakes of Malaysia

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Monitoring the habitat selection of lesser whistling Duck (Dendrocygna javanica) is highly crucial for species conservation and management. In this study, habitat selection of D. javanica in 14 heterogeneous lakes (direct visual observation and point sampling technique) and foraging ecology (scan through method) was investigated through April-September, 2016. It was observed that lake Belibis L1 was heavily preferred by D. javanica (i.e., 166.16 individuals) and less preferred lake Kemoning L11 (i.e., 0.2 individuals). However, three lakes i.e., Seroja L2, Telipok L3 and Drift Wood L4 were completely avoided by D. javanica (i.e., no individual was observed) during the study period. The highest pH value was observed in lake Grebe L8 (September 2016; 8.9) and the lowest one in lake Seroja L2

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Mix up plant species to keep soil healthy

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Across the globe, soils are under threat. Due changing land use to feed a growing population, climate change, and contamination of land with toxic chemicals, this precious resource is deteriorating, posing a serious threat to our future food security. When it comes to keeping our soil healthy, maintaining plant species diversity is key, according to new research.

Fall cover crops for livestock grazing may improve soil health, protect environment

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Turning cattle out to graze in harvested fields was once a common practice. It’s something that researchers would like to see used again–and improved by planting cover crops, such as such as oats, sorghum, turnips, radishes or millet. These have the potential to improve the soil health and utilize any remaining nutrients, thus preventing runoff that pollutes lakes and streams.

Population Status of Rhododendron mechukae-A Newly Recorded Endemic Species from Eastern Himalaya, India

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The present paper deals with a newly recorded Rhododendron species from Eastern Himalayas, India, which is categorized as a critically endangered species. Rhododendrons act as keystone species and maintain biological communities in the fragile higher altitudinal region of the Eastern Himalayas. However, due to various anthropological disturbances, which is further exacerbating by climate change impact, results in shrinkage of natural habitat of rhododendrons. This brings an urgent need of assessing the population status of the Rhododendron species in Eastern Himalayas. Keeping this in view, an attempt had been made to evaluate the population status of Rhododendron mechukae.

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The Effect of Zoo Visitors on Activity Patterns of Captive African Herbivores

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The role of zoos to conserve biodiversity is increasingly being recognized, but greater attention must be paid to good captive health, welfare, and population viability of species of interest. Several researchers have reported on the visitor effect on captive primate and felid behavior, and research has remained scarce on large captive herbivores, particularly in a mixed-species exhibit. The effect of zoo visitors on the activity budgets of twelve herbivores of four species at the Granby Zoo was investigated. The activity budget of individuals was monitored during the pre- and peak visitor seasons for a total of 20 observation days. Number of visitors had an effect on the daily activity budgets of Common elands and Thomson’s gazelle but did not have an effect on giraffes and zebras.

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CXCL6 is an important paracrine factor in the pro-angiogenic human cardiac progenitor-like cell secretome

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Studies in recent years have established that the principal effects in cardiac cell therapy are associated with paracrine/autocrine factors. We combined several complementary techniques to define human cardiac progenitor cell (CPC) secretome constituted by 914 proteins/genes; 51% of these are associated with the exosomal compartment. To define the set of proteins specifically or highly differentially…To know more please visit.. https://www.scitechnol.com/abstract/rapid-identification-of-e-coli-bacteriophages-using-mass-spectrometry-5943.html